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Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) + Its Applications With Swimming

UNDER THE SURFACE OF THE WATER LIES A SINISTER ISSUE NEARLY ALL SWIMMERS FACE IN THEIR CAREERS




According to studies from the FINA World Championships, a majority of swimmers had shoulder injuries that limited their performance 4 to 7 days leading to the event, and nearly forty-percent of those swimmers stated their performance was affected during the championship (Prient, et al. 2016). The epidemic of swimmer’s shoulder is at an all-time high. This general diagnosis, understood by most as rotator cuff impingement, affects every level of swimmer from amateur to professional. Unfortunately, the rates of shoulder injuries to swimmers have not only remained unchanged but actually increasing at a competitive level. This is due to the multifactorial issues in the swimmer’s shoulder that include technique flaws, lack of proper warm-ups, and non-specific treatment protocols. Few solutions have been given to decrease the rates of shoulder injuries. Surgical procedures are costly and even when done perfectly, the swimmer rarely returns to the level he or she was before the procedure. In addition, physical rehabilitation in the last few decades has only focused on isolated muscles and exercises that do not mimic the motions of the upper kinetic chain during swimming. 



The swimming community is in desperate need of a holistic, conservative approach to the management of the swimmer’s shoulder. The Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) Swimming Course provides the solution to this epidemic by introducing an innovative, dynamic method of evaluation and treatment that targets the entire kinetic chain, instead of individual components. This seminar focuses on stabilizing global movements that mimic the intricate details of each stroke in swimming. Whether you’re a clinician concerned about your aquatic patients, or a coach yearning for answers to your athletes’ aches and pains, this seminar will provide the answers you need to increase performance and decrease injuries that plague the swimming world at large. 



Prien A, Mountjoy M, Miller J, Boyd K,van den Hoogenband C, Gerrard D, Cherif MY, Lu Y, Nanousis K, Ortiz Liscano EI, Shahparn FM, Junge A. Injury and illness in aquatic sport: how high is the risk? A comparison of results from three FINA World Championships. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2017;51(4):277-282.

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